The 10 joys of getting older

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After the doom and gloom of the past few days, I needed a cheer-me-up so counted the blessings of growing older…

  1. No more periods.

A friend of mine adores Auntie Flo coming each month. “I feel like a woman,” she says. I say she’s a bloody fool – as I may have told her once or twice or 59 million times. No more pain, no more hassle, no more mood swings (that one’s added at the insistence of Mr 50 Sense). I mean, obviously, I’ll be saying goodbye to white jeans, pouring blue water on me knickers and skydiving, but some sacrifices are worth it. Continue reading

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My top ten telly programmes of all time – kinda

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I was having one of those flicky nights where no matter how many times I hit the remote control, there was still nothing to watch on TV. There are more channels than ever before and I went through every one of them – twice – in despair.

So I did what any 49-year-old would do. I bemoaned the state of modern life and started talking about “When I was younger…”, only to have Mr 50 Sense join in – what? This was my monologue – and start his own trip down memory lane which ended up with a “Guess the theme tune” from YouTube.

There were so many great TV shows that I’d forgotten about and bring back a wealth of memories. If I were on a desert island, here’s my top ten (and a bit). Continue reading

Five reasons why we had the best childhood

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I loved the BBC’s Back in Time for the Weekend. If you didn’t see it – and do try if it’s on again – a family basically spend 30 days living a decade, so day one and they’re back in 1950, day 2 is 1952, day 3 and its 1953 and so on, right through to the year 2000, living exactly how families in that year lived, complete with food, clothes and morals.

It really was a trip down memory lane, full of: “Eeee, do you remember…?” and: “Ha! Only the posh lot down the street had them.” and: “God, I’d forgotten about that.”

But perhaps the most interesting aspect was seeing how today’s young people – tweens and teenagers – reacted to being young in those decades. Continue reading